Sunday, December 23, 2012

Winter Day Market

This morning the sun was shining brightly; not a could; not a whisper of wind.  It was -19C (-2F) but quickly warmed up to -15.  The soft white snow covered a multitude of sins and crunched underfoot.  A perfect day.  So Tanya and I went to the market which is held every Sunday morning from 7 to noon.  She bought a sweater and gloves for Masha and a turkey for Christmas (mine), a goose  for New Years and an old duck to add to kholodets.

Kholodets is like headcheese in that one boils whatever until the meat falls off the bones, adds gelatin to the juice and lets it set.  It is eaten with hot mustard and is a major holiday treat at our house.  Since the main ingredient is two ox-tails, I suppose you could call it tail cheese but it doesn't sound like a big seller.

Lina is home sick with a terrible cold.  There is no heat at her office and if she brought an electric heater she would have to pay for it herself which would not be easy since she hasn't been paid for two months, we learned today.  The funeral and headstone business is pretty dead in the winter other than ceremonies.  Instead of telling some people they were laid off until spring, the owner just stopped paying every one.

The roads were plowed and sanded in town and behold! We have another stop light at a bad corner.  Not sure what is going on here.  But something strange is in the works.  Bank machines are always short of cash.  People are pulling everything out that they can. Rumours abound of something terrible happening in the new year regarding banks and currency.  Word on the street is that some government employees have not been paid for a couple months in some oblasts.  The PM and entire cabinet resigned just prior to a meeting with the IMF and I have been too lazy to track down why and who replaced them.

Today was our 6th anniversary so we threw a chicken in the oven and Andrei, Tanya and Masha came for supper. Tanya is 20+ weeks and starting to show. She goes for another thorough check up on Dec 25th.  Over 35 and almost 10 years since the last one, means the health system here gives her special treatment.

Andrei and his mother do not always see eye-to eye, so to speak.  He and I get on well, as we have a common enemy.  When they were going home tonight I said to him "Thank you for your mother".  His reply just cracked us all up. "Na zdorovia"  which means "To your health" and the tone was "You are welcome to her".

8 comments:

  1. Happy anniversary! Ours was four days before yours and it was our 41st.

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  2. Wanting to wish you and Tanya Merry Christmas and now I read Happy Anniversary!! A note to say thank you for all your kind comments in the past year or so...especially about my dad. We are doing good...xoxo...

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    1. Thanks, afcg and Merry Christmas to you and yours. Have missed your blog.

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  3. Well I guess it could be worse you could be living in Greece. I can only take heart that no situation lasts forever. At least that's what's gotten me through the last many years. May this new year be better for us all.

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    1. Greece or else where. The rich steal the money and the poor have to pay it back.

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  4. Happy anniversary! Merry Christmas! What other, wonderful things can I say?

    Hope you have a great 2013.

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    1. Thanks, Rob. Merry Christmas to you and yours too. Hope 2013 sees some of the things you have been fighting diminish and fighting for come to pass.

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