Sunday, March 24, 2013

Uşak (ooshak) History

Turkey (more correctly Asia Minor or even Anatolia) is old.  Civilizations in Turkey go back 10,000 years. Agriculture passed through Turkey on its way to Europe.  Everywhere you look in Turkey are ancient ruins of one civilization or another.

The territory of Uşak Province was once within the borders of the Hittite Empire, then within the Phrygia Kingdom, Lydian Kingdom and Persian Empire. The famous "King's Road" built during those times passes through Uşak. The province was incorporated into Macedonian empire in the 4th Century BC. It was taken under the rule of Roman Empire at the end of the 2nd Century BC. It was ruled by Byzantine for 700 years. After the 1071 Malazgirt Victory of the Seljuk Turks, Uşak was controlled by various Turkish Principalities and in 1429, it came under the Ottoman rule. It was occupied by the Greeks between August 29, 1920 and September 1, 1922 during the War of Independence. 
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karun_Treasure
King Croesus was the ruler of the Lydian Kingdom between 547-560 B.C. and is known for minting the first gold coins. The gold for his coins and for the treasures of his reign came from Uşak province. His treasure, known as the Karun Treasure, which was found in Uşak  province are some of many artifacts on display in the Archaeological Museum in Uşak city. The treasure is said to be cursed as the villagers who found and stole the treasure trove seemed to all come to bad ends.


More pictures HERE

The current museum is small, under staffed and under funded.  Construction has begun on a modern museum that will house the famous Karun treasure, the symbol of the Aegean province of Uşak, as part of a new museum complex in the Historical Uşak Train Station. The museum is scheduled to open this year according to this article

7 comments:

  1. I sure hope they can retain their culture. I'd hate to go there and find it with strip malls and box stores like in the U.S. and Canada. We are slowly losing our past history here in Seattle. Old shops are being torn down to build office buildings and condominiums. :-(

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    1. Large fancy malls and stores are being built in the larger centres such as Istanbul, Izmir and Ankara, catering to the middle and wealthier classes. But the real people still go to the small shops, markets and cafes located in their neighbourhoods. These will eventually disappear but not likely in our children's lifetimes. They look all quaint and cultural and stuff but in reality they are a life of slavery for the owners and workers.

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  2. I've often wondered what it must be like to live in a place with such a long human history. Here in Oregon, USA, the Native Americans go back 13,000 years, but they didn't leave a written record or much of any other kind of record, so it's not the same as in a place like Turkey.

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    1. Native Americans didn't leave much in the way of artifacts in many of the places they lived. But in other places such as Central America they did. I guess it depended on the conditions they lived under what they left behind. They were there as you say but it is hard to feel their presence, compared to a place like Turkey, I agree.

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    2. In Central America, they were a lot more advanced. In most of the U.S. all they left was arrowheads and other things made out of stone. The 13,000 year dating here in Oregon, USA, came from human scat (hardly and impressive artifact) that was found in cave. The previous oldest dating (10,000 years) came from sandals found in another cave.

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  3. I'm really enjoying the travelogue. Just a glimpse of places I'll never get to see is quite fascinating.

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    1. Thanks, Jono. I will keep them coming off and on.

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