Monday, May 8, 2017

More Photos from the Open Air Museum

Several of the buildings on the grounds are those you would find in a late 19th century Ukrainian village.  When we were there in 1997 there were three women in costume and a Kobzar (minstrel) playing a bandura.  





The houses owned by more wealthy would have tiled roofs

Simple cottages would have thatched roofs

The local bar. If you couldn't get over the style you were already too drunk to be served

Home of one of the wealthier families, likely holding a position of authority in the village

Stove, oven and storage space.  Painted white and decorated. In cold climates like Siberia it would have flat surfaces for family members to sleep on (children) 
Home of the village potter


Handmade teakettle

9 comments:

  1. I've enjoyed these 2 posts so much -- I just love places like this! We have something similar about an hour out of Edmonton called, appropriately enough, the Ukrainian Village. Awesome collection of pioneer-era Ukrainian homes, buildings, churches, etc.

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  2. I know the place but have not visited it. I have a wonderful story about the kids who worked there many decades ago. If I get permission I will blog about it

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  3. I love this so much..and love the likeness between Ukraine and my Czech's here in West.

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    1. Many similarities among to Eastern and Mid-European countries.

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  4. The stove and your remark about sleeping platforms was fascinating! I had read about Russians sitting on the stove in Donald Jack's books, but I couldn't visualize it until I saw your photo.

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    1. Google Russian stoves images and click on the pictures of white stoves. You should get a much better idea.

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    2. Wow! Now that's a smart use of "central heating"!

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  5. Thanks! I love places like this.

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