Sunday, January 24, 2010

By the Day or By the Hour

I stayed at a hotel in Kostanay, northern Kazakhstan which rented by the hour.  Now don't get me wrong.  It was a perfectly respectable establishment which had rates by the day, half day or hour.  There were no "working girls".  The hotel was located near the railway station so people would go there between trains or to wait for a train or what ever.  Flexible hours meant better service and it was busy.  It was fairly new, had a good restaurant, well appointed rooms and for me, most important - wireless internet.

But "by the hour" does lend itself to a certain amount of humour.

Especially the second night, when the sounds from the room overhead, beginning about 9:00 pm indicated the couple were not sleeping.  The woman was very vocally appreciative* of the attention shown her.  I emailed this information to Tanya who responded that I was a pervert for listening, that I should put the headphones over my ears and go to sleep and further that I should never go anywhere again without her.

I replied that I wished she was with me as we could have given them some competition, though I doubted for the full two hours and it certainly would have been easier to sleep**.

Tanya was telling Roman the next day, that I was staying at a bordello.  Roman said "Don't worry, Mom, the Kazakh girls are probably not too expensive".



*"I got a sweater for Christmas.  I was really hoping for a screamer or a moaner" - Stephen Wright.
**"The only thing better than the sleep of the just, is the sleep of the just after". David Frost.

6 comments:

  1. Well, she's right. You are a pervert.

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  2. All the best people are perverts. :)

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  3. Please try to remember that your daughters read this blog and just threw up in their mouth.

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  4. Roman was probably right!

    Did you have fun with the Kazak farmers? Did they learn anything? Did you learn anything (other than by the hour/night)?

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  5. RB - I learned that I could have described the cattle production problems and made suggestions for improvement without ever going to Kazakhstan or seeing their operations. The Soviet production system was all pervasive and still continues on as such since they know no other way.
    I hope to go back for a couple of seminars on how we do it and why. They can figure out what might work for them and how to adapt it. I won't tell them our way is best or the only way to do it. Culture and economics gets involved too.

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  6. BTW, used your David Frost comment in a different location. Thanks for the line.

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