Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Canadian Gasoline Prices in 2011

The Globe and Mail have an interesting map on their website today showing gasoline prices per litre in various cities across Canada. Prices for each city are the 2011 average (as of Feb. 15, 2011).

There are slightly less than 4 litres in an American gallon and slightly more than 4.5 litres in an Imperial gallon

Sorry, I chopped off Whitehorse at 110-119.9 per litre.

9 comments:

  1. Back in the 70s gas was cheaper in Canada than the US. It seemed higher, but it was the imperial gallon. In '79 we drove across Canada from Winnipeg to BC on our way to Seattle. In the 90s it was higher in Canada and it was litres. In any case the roads in Canada were always in good shape!!

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  2. Kulkiri is right. I drove trucks across Canada in the mid 70s. Even with the exchange rate figured in, Diesel fuel was cheaper.

    The added bonus was Canadian beer had a higher alcohol content.

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  3. This morning I paid 107.9 a litre. I'm just north of Toronto.

    ((Hugs))
    Laura

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  4. The cheap Canadian gas in the 1970's was Pierre Trudeau's National Energy Policy which force-ably kept Canadian energy prices below world prices. Alberta figures it cost the province about $3 billion in lost revenues and has NEVER forgiven the Liberal Party for it.

    Laura, that is roughly what we are paying for 95 octane gas here in Zhovti Vody. Our motors are much smaller and higher compression than NA so we must burn a higher octane gasoline. There is one or two higher than 95 in the big cities where the fancy cars are located.

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  5. Daily Chart from the Economist today is right on subject.
    http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/02/fuel_prices#comment-833405

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  6. In Congress, Arizona regular gas is $3.39 a gallon...diesel $3.79 and gallon...slightly cheaper in Phoenix but not much....I really feel for the people that have no choice...those that drive long distances for work...

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  7. The real kicker in all this folks is that supplies are up while demand is down. Somebody's playing speculator here me thinks. The same is happening with food.
    Strange that Canada has one of the largest supplies of oil and now one of the highest prices if you factor out the added taxes in Europe.

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  8. If you factor out the added taxes, the US pays more than Europe and has for many years.

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  9. It may well be speculation that oil supplies will tighten considerable if something untoward happens in the Middle East. Canadian gas prices are high at the pump because it includes about 33 to 35% taxes, both federal and provincial.

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